The Objectively Logical Answer to Victim Blaming

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Let’s say I wanted to walk to my friend’s house after dark.

I, myself, know that I risk getting attacked while I’m out. But, I really want to see my friend and it’s a nice night out. I’d really just like to go for that stroll.

So, I go for this stroll.

Let’s get really dark and suppose I’m attacked while I’m out.

Let’s discuss the aftermath of that, specifically this potential question: “Why were you out after dark if you didn’t want to get raped?”

1
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We value being allowed to walk there.
We DON’T value being able to do so if it’s after dark.
Conclusion: It is deductively valid to blame the victim.

2
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We DON’T value being allowed to walk there.
Conclusion: It is deductively valid to blame the victim.




3
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We DON’T value being able to go to a friend’s house.
Conclusion: It is deductively valid to blame the victim.

4
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We value being allowed to walk there.
We value being able to do so, even if it’s after dark.
Conclusion: It is NOT deductively valid to blame the victim.

 

Let’s think carefully about what we really value.

Now, let’s say we live in an alternate universe. You are a man. Even if you’re a woman, you’re a man in this scenario.

1
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We value being allowed to walk there.
We DON’T value being able to do so if it’s after dark.
Because we don’t value being able to do so, it is illegal for men to go out at night.
You do so anyway.
You’re arrested.
Conclusion: We should be totally ok with this arrest happening.

Yes, it makes sense that if you break the law, you’ll be arrested, but that’s not the same as being ok with it.

If someone told you it was against the law to eat, you’d still think it was fucking wrong when you get arrested for it.

And that’s what we’re talking about – whether or not we’re going to feel like you didn’t have the right to do what you did.

2
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We DON’T value being allowed to walk there.
Because we don’t value being able to walk there, it is illegal for men to walk outside by themselves.
You do so anyway.
You’re arrested.
Conclusion: We should be totally ok with this arrest happening.




3
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We DON’T value being able to go to a friend’s house.
Because we don’t value being able to go to a friend’s house, it is illegal for men to go to their friends’ houses.
You do so anyway.
You’re arrested.
Conclusion: We should be totally ok with this arrest happening.

4
I wanted to go to my friend’s house.
I felt like walking.
It happened to be night time when I wanted to go.
We value being able to go to a friend’s house.
We value being allowed to walk there.
We value being able to do so, even if it’s after dark.
Conclusion: It is NOT deductively valid to arrest you for walking to your friend’s house at night.

In these cases, we kept our values the same, we just changed who they applied to.

IF you value the freedom to walk to a friend’s house at night, there is no reason for it to be illegal. There is no reason for society to question your right to do so.

If you DON’T value the freedom to walk to a friend’s house, there would be no reason to be legal.

Again, we’re not talking about whether or not you can do this – we’re only talking about the social and legal notion that walking to your friend’s house is somehow not an inalienable right.

The only matter in question is whether or not this it is your RIGHT to be able to do so.

“Why did you walk to your friend’s house alone at night if you didn’t want to get raped?” Because I felt like it and it is my fucking right.

This applies to every other excuse.

Drinking alcohol? Do we value the right to drink alcohol? The fall of prohibition would suggest that we do. That’s a right. You’re allowed to do that.

Wearing something sexy? Is it a right to wear something that could attract the opposite sex? If it’s not, then why shouldn’t we take away that right for everybody?

It can’t be “ruined for you” if you don’t think it’s something you have a right to in the first place.

Think about that.




Author: A. Primate

Mammal. Organizes itself into complex social hierarchies. Very particular about objects - even those that can't be eaten or used for shelter. Seemingly aware of itself as separate from the environment.

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