Fallacy: Moving the Goalposts, or No True Scotsman
Nov02

Fallacy: Moving the Goalposts, or No True Scotsman

Read in one minute  Moving the goalposts is a rather straight forward fallacy to understand. Imagine yourself on an endless field with two literal goalposts that are constantly being moved. At the beginning, someone tells you that you have been successful when you run between the goal posts. So, you start running. Then, as you’re approaching the goal, someone lifts up the posts and moves them further away… then...

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Fallacy: Appeal to Consequences
Oct20

Fallacy: Appeal to Consequences

Read in one minute  An appeal to consequences states that something must be true or false because the consequences of it being such would be either negative or positive.   Example of Appeal to Consequences fallacy: God must be real because if he isn’t, then there’s no ultimate punishment for wrongdoings. Premise 1: There should be some ultimate punishment for people doing bad things. Premise 2: God punishes...

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Fallacy: Appeal to Popularity
Oct20

Fallacy: Appeal to Popularity

Read in one minute  When we appeal to popularity, we are suggesting that just because many people believe something, it is true.   Example of appeal to popularity You’re obviously mistaken about this whole, ‘the Earth is round’ thing. If you look at any poll, you’ll see that the majority of people believe the Earth is flat. Premise: Most people believe the Earth is flat. Conclusion: The Earth is flat....

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Fallacy: the Straw Man
Oct19

Fallacy: the Straw Man

Read in 2 minutes  A straw man argument attempts to change the original position so that it’s easier to attack. A straw man argument appears to refute the original statement, but actually refutes a similar yet altered argument.   Example of a straw man fallacy Sally says women should make as much as a man does for doing the same work, but women obviously can’t lift as much as men can so I don’t understand why we...

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Fallacy: Faulty Generalization
Oct19

Fallacy: Faulty Generalization

Read in 2 minutes  A faulty generalization assumes that if some members of a group are like X, then all members of a group are like X. You can also call this fallacy, “basically every prejudice that has ever existed.”   Example of a faulty generalization fallacy If you don’t believe that white men are more violent than the rest of the population, how do you explain Ted Bundy, Charles Manson, John Wayne Gacy, Ted...

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Fallacy: Burden of Proof
Oct19

Fallacy: Burden of Proof

Read in one minute  If you make an assertion without any evidence and state that you are correct until someone else proves you wrong, you have committed the burden of proof fallacy.   Example of burden of proof fallacy Josh: We’ll generate twice as many sales if we label our cabbage as celery. Michael: What? How do you figure? Josh: Can you prove me wrong? Again, our premises and conclusions can be assumed: Premise 1:...

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